Speciality Brands adds Irish whiskies from The Shed Distillery

Speciality Brands has signed an exclusive deal with The Shed Distillery of PJ Rigney to distribute its first global whiskey release, Drumshanbo Single Pot Still Irish Whiskey, in the UK.

The new addition is joining Speciality Brands’ premium world whiskies portfolio which already includes Nikka from Japan, Michter’s from Kentucky, Kavalan from Taiwan and Irish Single Malt Waterford.

Global Irish whiskey sales grew by 10.9% in 2019 and the UK remains one of its leading export markets accounting for over 4.2 million litres in volume, according to premium spirits agency Speciality Brands.

The Shed Distillery, also home to Drumshanbo Gunpowder Irish Gin, Ireland’s leading gin export brand, decided to create an “authentic, Irish single pot still whiskey with great provenance to appeal to enthusiasts globally”. Drumshanbo Single Pot Still Irish Whiskey is slow-distilled by hand at The Shed Distillery.

The Shed Distillery opened in December 2014 in Drumshanbo, country Leitrim, in the heart of rural Ireland, making history as the first distillery in the Northwestern province of Connacht in over 100 years.

Head Distiller, Brian Taft said: “Drumshanbo Single Pot Still Irish Whiskey is a well-balanced whiskey, which dances effortlessly between sweet and spice, possessing a full, well-rounded creamy mouthfeel that lingers lightly on the tongue.”

Chris Seale, managing director, Speciality Brands, said: “We’re delighted to add Drumshanbo Single Pot Still Irish Whiskey to our world whisky portfolio as we’ve been looking to add a traditional Irish pot still whiskey to our range for some time. Provenance is really important to us and the fact that Drumshanbo is 100% hand-distilled and aged at the Shed Distillery is setting it apart from many other brands coming out of Ireland that simply don’t have this level of control or traceability.”

The 43% abv Drumshanbo Single Pot Still Irish Whiskey launches this month and will be available at selected retailers, priced at £50.

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